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Marijuana Laws in Colorado

Posted by CANNASaver on Friday, 05 June 2015 in Canna Blog

Colorado Recreational Marijuana Laws

With the passing of Amendment 64 on November 6, 2012 adults 21 years of age and older can now legally possess 1 ounce of marijuana or any product containing THC in Colorado, including concentrates, edibles and cannabis seeds. Recreational stores didn't officially open until January 1, 2014. You don't have to be a resident of Colorado or register anywhere to consume recreational marijuana, it applies to anyone 21 and above who has a valid government issued ID. The law also allows each adult to grow up to 6 plants, 3 of which can be in the flowering stage in an enclosed, locked space.

Although any adult is allowed to possess up to 1 ounce, non-residents of Colorado will be restricted to purchasing no more than 1/4 ounce (7 grams) in a single transaction. This law was created to prevent visitors from going around to multiple stores and stockpiling marijuana for export. There is nothing illegal about visiting more than 1 store a day, but most recreational stores will only serve you once a day. As long as you don't exceed the 1 ounce per person possession limit, you are still within the law. Please be aware that your right to possess marijuana in Colorado does not apply when you are visiting national parks, national forests or monuments or other federal properties, such as courthouses.  Also be aware that many ski areas are located on federal land.

The state allows marijuana stores to operate from 8am to midnight, but cities can impose more restrictive hours than the state allows. Denver stores are required to close by 7pm, Aurora stores are open till 10pm and other places like Glendale are open till midnight, so check the hours of the store if you plan on going after 7pm.

Amendment 64 does not permit the consumption of marijuana "openly and publicly." You can still get a ticket for smoking weed in public, similar to open container laws for drinking in public. Discretion is appreciated, and usually required. Technically you are also not allowed to blaze indoors at any bar, club, or restaurant due to the clean indoor air act. Private cannabis clubs are the exception to this rule, where you can buy a day membership. Some allow indoor smoking since they are private and others allow vaping inside and smoking outside. Even though concert venues are private, many consider them publicly accessible private venues, and therefore consumption of marijuana is prohibited, but it really depends on the venue and the crowd as to how these rules are applied, so just air on the cautious side when smoking at a concert.

Driving under the influence of marijuana is illegal and the legal limit is 5 nanograms per milliliter of blood, but this law has been highly debated because people metabolize THC at different rates and the amount of impairment varies drastically for each person. Unlike alcohol, it's hard to determine if a person is impaired based on THC levels. If the police do suspect you of driving stoned, they can require you to take a blood test. We all should know when were impaired or not, so just be smart and don't drive under the influence.

The open container law  in Colorado makes it illegal to possess marijuana in the passenger area of a vehicle if it is in an open container, a container with a broken seal, or if there is evidence of consumption.  But this is questionable because what constitutes an open container of marijuana? 

Exporting marijuana from Colorado is illegal and the Feds are watching Colorado very closely as the bordering states are extremely pissed off that we have such relaxed marijuana laws, so simply put, don't do it. Mailing weed home or to your buddies is also a bad idea.




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If successful, the California Craft Cannabis Initiative could lead to better quality cannabis in California and beyond. Drafted by lawyers Heather Burke and Omar Figueroa, the initiative is one of a large handful of recreational marijuana legalization measures vying to make it onto the November 2016 statewide ballot. In addition to retroactively legalizing the use, cultivation, possession, transportation, processing, distribution, and sale of marijuana by persons 21 years of age and older, the initiative would establish a seed bank dedicated to the preservation and development of cannabis strains, and would also provide incentives to encourage small-scale growers to produce top-quality weed. We've all heard of craft beers, but have you ever heard of craft cannabis? The concept is the same whether we're talking beer or buds. Small-scale, focused production allows artisans the opportunity to create unique, unusual, or specialty products of often exceptional quality. If California's Craft Cannabis Initiative passes, craft cannabis growers could actually register and trademark their buds. For instance, their would likely be regional designations such as “Humboldt County” or “Emerald Triangle,” as well as certified strains.

What this would mean for the average California cannabis consumer is that what you pay for is what you get, at least when purchasing a certified or trademark-registered product. Seems like a simple enough consumer expectation, but this isn't always the case in legal recreational cannabis states like Colorado, Oregon, and Washington where strains are often misnamed, ill grown, and poorly preserved in the mass-production frenzy of trying to meet an ever-rising demand. No means for certifying any particular strains of marijuana exist in these states, which basically results in anyone being able to call their buds anything they like and sell them under any name they choose, and consumers having nothing other than their own eyes, nose, and knowledge of cannabis to help them tell the difference. That Lemon Haze might be Lemon Haze, or it might not. That “rare” strain whose name you've never heard of before could be good old Blue Dream with a fancy new alias. If the initiative in California passes and other states decide to adopt their own certification mechanisms, consumers would be able to tell exactly what they were getting, and growers would have an incentive to protect their strains and develop them to their fullest potential.

The California Craft Cannabis Initiative would also provide an opportunity for growers to have their crops certified organic. This is something none of the legal marijuana states currently offer, which again leaves the consumer with little but their own judgment and the shopkeeper's word to go on when hoping to purchase organically-grown cannabis. As it stands, much of the marijuana sold at dispensaries is coated with pesticides and often contains fungus or heavy metals. It might say “organic,” but there isn't really any way of knowing whether or not it actually is. The California Craft Cannabis Initiative would make it possible for consumers to choose products that are certified organic, which could encourage other legal weed states to follow suit.

The initiative also calls for the establishment of the California Cannabis Genetic Repository. The repository would collect germplasm from all known cannabis strains, carefully preserving and documenting the biodiversity of the cannabis genus. Researchers and others wishing to study the cannabis plant would have free access to the repository, which could lead to the development of strains with higher potency, new hybrids, and more. As the nation's herb supply continues to be flooded with mislabeled or wrongly identified strains, preserving the genetics of specific cannabis strains becomes increasingly important not just for California, but for the world. The sponsors of the California Craft Cannabis Initiative have until December 21st to collect the 365,880 signatures required to get the measure placed on next November's ballot. There are at least ten other recreational cannabis legalization initiatives that are in the process of meeting requirements to make it on the ballot, as well. For more information including the full text of the California Craft Cannabis Initiative, visit www.californiacannabis2016.com .

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Oregon loses Hightimes Cannabis Cup in 2015 to Northern Cali!

It is a sad day in Oregon when the OLCC (Oregon Liquor Control Commission) will prevent a huge event like Hightimes Cannabis Cup from being in a venue that is large enough for 5000+ people. Regardless if liquor is served or not this did not matter to the OLCC when they threatened that any venue that allowed Hightimes to throw their event would be in danger of losing their liquor license. According to Hightimes this one Cannabis Cup could have brought in hundreds of thousands of dollars and possibly millions of dollars in revenue for Oregon.
 
Amanda YoungerHIGH TIMES Event Director, stated “Bringing the HIGH TIMES Cannabis Cup to Oregon has proven to be a Herculean task— in fact, it’s been the most difficult of all of our Cannabis Cups to get off the ground.

It seems funny that the citizens of a State that has made the choice to legalize marijuana
still have to pay the penalty for old school politics. 

What do YOU think?

We have noticed while reading the news lately that there is
still a lot Canna Bigotry in the United States.

Like for instance, Cyd Maurer, 25, a University of Oregon graduate who was the morning weekend anchor at Eugene's ABC affiliate "KEZI."  She was fired after getting into a minor accident while on the job. She was truthful with her supervisor about the use of legal recreational marijuana but of course after her drug test for work came back positive for THC she was fired.

Well guess what?


She's fighting back and now is a activist for the legal marijuana movement.

What are the weed laws going to be in the future?
This is a very touchy situation now that Oregon has made marijuana legal.

How does this play out with you and your job?


Canna Saver Oregon would love to hear what your thoughts are on this topic.
Express yourself - You never know there may be a coupon in it for ya. LOL 
Have a Beautiful Oregon Day!
 

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