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Where the 2016 Presidential Candidates Stand on Marijuana Legalization.

By Melanie Marquis

If you own a cannabis-based business or work in the recreational marijuana industry, there's a big reason besides politics to start paying attention to the 2016 Presidential race. Depending on who gets elected and how much our new President's influence is able to sway the direction of U.S. Policy, your very livelihood could be at stake. While it's never clear what a candidate's actual policies will be once they get into office, the things they've said in the past can indeed provide strong indications.

The Marijuana Policy Project website provides an evaluation of such indications, and their ratings provide cause for alarm. Only one viable candidate received a grade “A” on their policy regarding legalized marijuana—Bernie Sanders. Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton scored a “B,” Donald Trump a mediocre “C+,” and Marco Rubio an even lower grade of “D.”

To help you evaluate these candidates for yourself, we've compiled a sampling of relevant quotes from these politicians and their campaigns. Take a look, and if anything concerns you, be sure to do further research so that you can be sure to know who (and for what) you are voting for.

Marco Rubio: If one thing positive can be said about Marco Rubio's position on legal cannabis, it's that at least he makes his stance on the issue very clear. When he was a guest on the Hugh Hewitt Radio Show in February 2015, he was asked if he would enforce federal law and shut down the legal recreational marijuana industry in Colorado. Rubio responded, “Yes. Yes, I think, well, I think we need to enforce our federal laws. Now do states have a right to do what they want? They don't agree with it, but they have their rights. But they don't have a right to write federal policy as well.” He goes on to explain, “I don't believe we should be in the business of legalizing additional intoxicants in this country for the primary reason that when you legalize something, what you're sending a message to young people is it can't be that bad, because if it was that bad, it wouldn't be legal.” He reiterated that view at a Meet the Press conference in August of 2015, when he was asked if he would enforce federal law in states where cannabis legal. Rubio responded, “Absolutely. I believe that the federal government needs to enforce federal law.” Earlier this year, Rubio was quoted in the Washington Times as saying, “There is no responsible way to smoke marijuana repeatedly. There's nothing good about it.”

Donald Trump:  Trump's position, however, seems to change with the times. Way back in 1990, he favored the legalization of all drugs, calling the War on Drugs a failure. But when asked at a conference last June how he felt about Colorado's legalization of cannabis, Trump stated, “I say it's bad. Medical marijuana is another thing, but I think it's bad, and I feel strongly about it.” At an event just a few months later in October, Trump had this to say: “Marijuana is such a big thing. I think medical should happen—right? Don't we agree? I think so. And then I really believe we should leave it up to the states.” He then went on to mention Colorado specifically, saying, “And of course you have Colorado. And I love Colorado and the people are great, but there's a question as to how it's all working out there, you know? That's not going exactly trouble-free. So I really think that we should study Colorado, see what's happening.”

Hillary Clinton: Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton seems generally positive about marijuana legalization at the state level, but seems hesitant to take an official position one way or another. In 2015, Clinton aired her support for legalization in Colorado, saying, “I really believe it’s important that states like Colorado lead the way, so that we can learn what works and what doesn’t work. And I would certainly not want the federal government to interfere with the legal decision made by the people of Colorado, and enforced by your elected officials, as to how you should be conducting this business that you have approved.” As a guest on WBZ Radio in January 2016, Clinton was asked about her stance on marijuana legalization and replied, “I think that states are the laboratories of democracy, and four states have already taken action to legalize, and it will be important that other states and the federal government take account of how that’s being done, what we learn from what they’re doing. I think that the states moving forward is appropriate and I think the federal government has to move to make this more available for research that they can then distribute to interested people across our country.” She went on to explain, “I do think on the federal level we need to remove marijuana from the Schedule I of drugs, move it to Schedule II, which will permit it to be the basis for medical research because it’s important that we learn as much as possible.”

Bernie Sanders: Bernie Sanders is the only candidate so far to take a clear and undeniable stance in favor of federal marijuana legalization. As a senator, Sanders introduced legislation in November 2015 that would result in marijuana being removed from the federal list of controlled substances, and allow states the power to regulate and tax marijuana if they have the desire to do so. Under Sanders's plan, cannabis-based businesses would also be ensured fair and non-discriminatory access to banking services and standard tax deductions just like any other business. According to the Bernie Sanders campaign website, “Bernie favors removing marijuana from the list of controlled substances regulated by federal law. Under Bernie’s proposal, people in states which legalize marijuana no longer would be subject to federal prosecution for using pot. Owners of stores that sell marijuana could fully participate in the banking system, like any other business.” Sanders also seems to favor reforming the way marijuana cases are handled in America's justice system, stating, “Someone in the United States is arrested every minute on marijuana charges. Too many Americans have seen their lives destroyed because they have criminal records as a result of marijuana use. That’s wrong. That has got to change.”

Why it Matters:

Currently, federal laws against marijuana cause complications for many cannabis-based business entrepreneurs in states where commercial cannabis is legal, and the federal classification of marijuana as a schedule 1 controlled substance prevents hemp production and manufacturing from being economically viable under present law. Meanwhile, more and more states are seeing voter-led ballot initiatives to make recreational cannabis legal, and states like Colorado where it is already legal are experiencing the benefits of massive profit. Whoever wins the next Presidential election will likely hold heavy sway on determining which way the tide will turn.

Sources:

Marijuana Policy Project, “Where Do they Stand on Marijuana Policy,” Marijuana Policy Project, accessed March 11, 2016, https://www.mpp.org/2016-presidential-candidates/

“Trump Softens Position on Marijuana Legalization,” by Jenna Johnson, The Washington Post online, October 29, 2015, accessed March 11, 2016, https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2015/10/29/trump-wants-marijuana-legalization-decided-at-the-state-level/

 

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STATES VOTE YES $8 BILLION EXPECTED

 

Hello, and thank you. It is now time to mark this date in history in yet another forward movement for man kind and conduct happy celebration for the cannabis reception of the century.  Several states now take a position on the pro-cannabis course that's expected to generate at least another $8 billion in cannabis revenues as this ramps up.

 California now joins the union where recreational pot has already been in sales and use; Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington. California being the top dog obviously due to the large population has approved recreational cannabis and anticipates an estimated annual revenue of $1.4 billion dollars on rec sales alone. Cali already sees an estimated $2.7 billion from legal medical pot sales.

 Nate Bradley, executive director of the California Cannabis Industry Association said, "Proposition 64 will allow California to take its rightful place as the center of cannabis innovation, research and development. We are very excited that citizens of California voted to end the failed policy of marijuana prohibition."

 Chief Ken Corney, president of the California Police Chiefs Association seems a tad bit annoyed as one can assume by his statement, "We are, of course, disappointed that the self-serving moneyed interests behind this marijuana business plan prevailed at the cost of public health, safety, and the wellbeing of our communities.” “We will take a thorough look at the flaws in Proposition 64 that will negatively impact public health and safety, such as the initiative’s substandard advertising restrictions and lack of prosecutorial tools for driving under the influence of marijuana, and begin to develop legislative solutions."  Sort of a buzz kill dude.

abc10 reports that since Proposition 64 passed Tuesday night, adult use of recreational marijuana is now legal in California. People over the age of 21 are now allowed to carry and use up to an ounce of marijuana and grow up to six plants for personal use.

 Marijuana will be legal for commercial sale once businesses receive proper licensing, according to California NORML, a group dedicated to reforming the state's marijuana laws.

 

When can you start to Recreationally smoke?

Technically, you may use marijuana without a medical card starting at midnight November 9, 2016. Restricted areas of use include all public places, according to NORML.

So to recap history, Arkansas, Florida and North Dakota voted in favor of legalized use, sales, and consumption of medical marijuana. California, Massachusetts and Nevada have voted in favor legalized recreational marijuana in each of their states, but Arizona did not pass.

 

What's the financial future?

 A recent study found that in 2015, the  legalization of cannabis infused Colorado with nearly $120 million in new tax revenue. Sales were closing in on  $1 billion and it's been reported that by the year 2020, the U.S. cannabis industry could reach over $22 billion. More revenue, more career opportunities, less stress on society and more sales at the snack counter. Now that's a perfect world!

 

Enjoy the Now~

Mr.D

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CannaSaver Blog

Marijuana Most Certainly Trumped the Election!

Posted by CANNASaver on Thursday, 10 November 2016 in Canna Blog

Marijuana Won Big with More States Voting Yes for Recreational or MMJ

The 2016 election results are rolling in, and more states have voted to legalize recreational marijuana. With several states also voting to expand or legalize medical marijuana, it's a greener day today in America. Recreational marijuana legalization was on the ballot in Massachusetts, California, Maine, Arizona, and Nevada, while voters in Arkansas, Florida, North Dakota and Montana faced ballot questions relating to the initiation or expansion of medical marijuana programs. Cannabis activists around the country put in countless hours of work campaigning for marijuana legalization, and while their efforts didn't win out across the board, the 2016 election results are a definite win for marijuana.

Here are the state by state election results for recreational marijuana legalization and medical marijuana

Massachusetts marijuana election results

Massachusetts voters decided on Question 4 legalizing marijuana throughout the state. With 96% of people precincts reporting, the Massachusetts Question 4 results were 54% in favor of marijuana legalization with a lead of over 230,000 votes. Recreational marijuana will now be legalized in Massachusetts.

This measure allows for the sale, cultivation, use, and distribution of marijuana for adults age 21 or older and establishes a system for regulating and taxing retail marijuana sales.

California recreational marijuana election results

California voters decided to approve Proposition 64 legalizing recreational marijuana throughout the state. With 96% of the votes counted, Proposition 64 was leading by more than 1,000,000 votes. These California election results legalize marijuana recreational sales, possession, and cultivation.

Arizona election results for marijuana legalization

In Arizona election results for Proposition 205 did not legalize marijuana possession for adults age 21 and older. With 98% of the votes counted, there were over 80,000  more votes opposing Proposition 205 than there were votes in favor of marijuana legalization. For now, recreational marijuana remains illegal in Arizona.

Maine marijuana legalization election results

Maine voters decided on marijuana legalization initiative that would legalize marijuana possession of up to 2 ½ ounces and allow residents to grow up to six marijuana plants. At the time of this writing,the vote is extremely close with those in favor of Maine marijuana legalization having a slight lead. With 90% of precincts reporting, the marijuana legalization initiative had earned 50% of the votes with a less than 5,000 vote difference between those in favor and those opposed.

Nevada marijuana election results

Nevada marijuana election results have legalized marijuana possession and recreational sales, establishing a 15% sales tax and giving established medical marijuana dispensaries in Nevada the first opportunity to apply for a recreational marijuana sales license. The Nevada marijuana legalization initiative passed by a very slim margin of less than 100,000 votes.

Arkansas marijuana legalization election results

In Arkansas voters decided in favor of medical marijuana legalization by a slim margin of less than 70,000 votes. The election results for Arkansas marijuana legalization Issue 6 legalizes marijuana use for 17 different medical conditions.

Florida medical marijuana election results

Florida has legalized medical marijuana.Florida medical marijuana election results legalize marijuana use for approved debilitating conditions and diseases. Amendment 2 passed by a wide margin. With 100% of precincts reporting, 71% of voters chose to legalize medical marijuana in Florida, with nearly 4,000,000 more votes in favor than in opposition.

Montana marijuana election results

Montana voters decided to expand the state’s medical marijuana program, voting in favor of Montana medical marijuana initiative I-182. With 97% reporting, the medical marijuana measure had won 57% of the vote. These election results repeal the three patient limit imposed on medical marijuana providers, adds PTSD and chronic pain to the list of approved conditions, and paves the way for the expansion of the medical marijuana industry in Montana.

North Dakota medical marijuana election results

North Dakota medical marijuana election results are in favor of medical marijuana legalization by a 64% margin. North Dakota Measure 5 legalizes medical marijuana for epilepsy, glaucoma, cancer, ALS, and several other specified conditions.

Marijuana Legalization across America

These 2016 election results show that the tides have turned in favor of marijuana. Marijuana legalization is being adopted by more and more states, and if the trend continues, marijuana legalization at the federal level seems almost inevitable. For now, marijuana entrepreneurs in the newly legal marijuana states are scrambling to get their business plans in place and their applications ready to file, and marijuana activists are celebrating victories while looking ahead to a time when marijuana is legal across America.

 

 

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What the 2016 Election Means for Legal Marijuana

As the 2016 election draws near, the cannabis industry and community is waiting anxiously to see what a new administration will mean for legal marijuana. Will the many marijuana dispensaries be allowed to remain open under a new administration? Will marijuana become legal across the country, or will legal weed be completely shut down? Which candidate is likely to win, and where do the top candidates and political parties stand on the issue of legal cannabis? With billions of dollars at stake and access to medication on the line, the future of cannabis effects millions of Americans. Here is a breakdown of how cannabis legalization might be handled under a Clinton, Trump, or Stein administration.

Clinton and the Democrats on Cannabis:

In 2007, Hillary Clinton summarized her feelings on marijuana legalization by saying “I don't think we should decriminalize it,” and in 2016, her official stance is that she does support moving marijuana from the Schedule 1 list of controlled substances, which are considered the most dangerous, to the Schedule 2 class of drugs where it would reside along other prescription medications such as opium and codeine. If marijuana does end up reclassified to Schedule 2, it could possibly lead to further prohibitions on the sale of cannabis as marijuana could potentially become subject to the same rules and FDA regulations as other prescription drugs.

The Democratic party as a whole seems to be taking the smallest of steps beyond Clinton's stance, deciding at the Democratic National Committee's 2016 National Platform meeting to endorse an amendment that would recommend legalizing marijuana federally and offer legal marijuana businesses protection from federal interference. The amendment would stop short of truly decriminalizing marijuana nationwide, however. Marijuana would be legal at a federal level, but it would be up to states to decide for themselves whether or not they wish to keep marijuana illegal or legal within their own state borders. The vote in support of endorsing the marijuana amendment passed with only a one vote margin, with a sharp division between Bernie Sanders supporters in favor and Hillary Clinton supporters opposed.

Trump and the Republicans on Cannabis

Meanwhile, cannabis legalization in any form doesn't seem to be anywhere on the Republican radar, despite the number of Veterans and others who depend on marijuana for medical reasons. Neither medical marijuana nor marijuana decriminalization or even reclassification will be a part of the 2016 Republican platform. Donald Trump, meanwhile, sounds a whole lot like Clinton. He seems to favor medical marijuana and says that states should decide their own marijuana laws without federal interference. Without the backing of his party on these endeavors, however, many are skeptical about his ability to actually carry any of that out.

Stein and the Green Party on Cannabis

Jill Stein and the Green Party as a whole are in full support of marijuana legalization, for both medical as well as recreational marijuana. Stein believes that “Marijuana is a drug that is dangerous because it's illegal. It isn't illegal because it's dangerous.” The official platform of the Green Party states that “Cannabis/Hemp is to be legalized, regulated and controlled like cigarettes and alcohol. Until this happens we advocate that medical marijuana be made a prescription drug that doctors may prescribe to their patients.” If Stein were to win the presidency, efforts to truly legalize marijuana across our country at both the national and state levels could be expected and the marijuana industry could breathe a sigh of relief.

Who will win?

In a poll last week following the Republican National Convention, Trump and Clinton appeared to be very close in popularity, with Clinton scoring 41% of supporters to Trump's 38%. The poll, conducted by Reuters/Ipsos, surveyed 1036 English-speaking voters in 50 states. However, polling numbers are traditionally less accurate during this time period, with candidates often getting a short-lived boost following official nomination at the Party conventions. The New York Times presidential forecast gives Hillary Clinton a 74% chance to win. Does Jill Stein have a chance? If the thousands of marijuana business owners and millions of marijuana users decide to put protecting and expanding legal cannabis above other political concerns, Stein could very well become our country's next president. Only time will tell, so for now, smoke it if you've got it!

 

 

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CannaSaver Blog

The Green Party Stance on Marijuana Legalization

Posted by CANNASaver on Wednesday, 26 October 2016 in Canna Blog

Marijuana and The Green Party


With the 2016 elections quickly approaching and Green Party candidates like Jill Stein coming onto the radar of an increasing number of disillusioned voters, many in the marijuana industry are wondering, just how green is the Green Party? What is the party’s stance on marijuana reform, and would the marijuana industry find some safeguards under Green Party leadership? Would marijuana dispensaries in Colorado and other legal weed states face fewer regulations or more? While Presidential candidate Jill Stein isn't expected to get anywhere near the number of votes she needs to win, she may very well get enough votes to earn the Green Party a spot in future election debates. The Green Party already holds over 100 positions across the nation at the city and county level, and with more and more states opening up to legal marijuana, the party is definitely gaining supporters as well as attention. Here is the lowdown on where the Green Party stands on the green.

Protection for the Marijuana Industry

The Green Party platform includes powerful protections and safeguards for the legal marijuana industry, which is important to states like Colorado where marijuana is big business. Not only does the party platform call for the legalization of cannabis possession, sale, and cultivation, but also the DEA would be instructed to not interfere with or harass legally operating cannabis businesses, from marijuana cultivation centers to marijuana dispensaries and marijuana social clubs. Marijuana entrepreneurs would have some assurance that their businesses could continue, while new marijuana entrepreneurs would have the protection needed to open new businesses and industries.

Amnesty for marijuana offenders

The Green Party platform also calls for serious reforms to how the criminal justice system handles drug offenders. Drug use and abuse would no longer be handled as a crime but as a medical issue, and anyone currently being held on charges for non-violent marijuana crimes would be released.

Opponents worry that the Green Party's stance on drugs goes too far, not only legalizing cannabis but also paving the way for the decriminalization of extremely dangerous drugs such as crack and heroin.

Running on Reefer

Green Party candidates are outspoken in their support of marijuana legalization. Throughout her campaign, Presidential candidate Jill Stein has made reference to the need for drug reform and has voiced her support for marijuana legalization at the national level. Other Green Party candidates are also using marijuana legalization to gain supporters. Vanessa Tijerina, who is running for a congressional seat in southern Texas, has made a point of bringing medical marijuana into the spotlight, campaigning to raise public awareness about the medical benefits of cannabis.

The Future of the Green

With a majority of Americans now supporting marijuana legalization, the Green Party with its pro-cannabis platform could soon become a prominent feature of our country’s political landscape. While they're unlikely to win many races this time around, the mere presence of Green Party candidates on the ballot brings needed attention to marijuana legalization and the millions of citizens who support it. With dispensaries and other marijuana businesses on the line in states like Colorado, the sharp divisions that have separated political parties for decades have already begun to blur.

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Marijuana Legalization What it means for California and Other States

by Mrd 

Recreational cannabis cultivation, sales and use are the premise of Amendment 64. California voters will have the power and authority to follow the lead set by 1,383,139 Colorado voters on NoMvember 6, 2012, who voted yes to legalize cannabis.  A 52% favorable vote which has already had great impact on the industry forcing systems, rules and regulations into place. 

 It's reported that California's legalization of recreational marijuana would bank $1 billion in additional taxes per year.  Colorado collected more than $135 million in legal cannabis taxes and fees in 2015. If you compare the market size and tremendous growth in consumer purchases, $1 billion just may be a bit little low.

 On November 8, 2016, nearly 40 million California voters can flex their patriotic right to approve Amendment 64 which would legalize recreational sales to those age 21 and over.  Online consensus shows a strong positive movement toward legalization.

 Other states prepare to address many of the same issues and cultural norms within their communities when it comes to legalization.  Fortunately, in this country, voters have the power to make a difference and change old paradigms that no longer fit, ethically, morally or scientifically when there is greater benefit to all.

 If the population is educated with unbiased, un-agendaed, facts, with the number one understanding that in practise cannabis assists in relieving pain in the human body.  It is a plant that has a great impact on health, and obviously finances.

 Every state where medical marijuana is legal, you can expect recreational pot to follow.  There's an old saying, "Follow the money" and in this paradigm, it's growing out of the ground.

 Overall, legal marijuana in California, Colorado and every state that is forward thinking will have its impact.  Communities from coast to coast will begin to notice a much more positive vibe in their hoods as the populus begins to RELAX, and exhale from life's roller coaster ride.

 There will be less alcohol incidents, less fighting, less arguing and much more creativity flowing between neighbors.  Entrepreneurially speaking, the cannabis industry has already opened the door for those with the desire to become financially independant.  The cannabis industry has opened new avenues for job creation and for educational institutions who must teach the new industry employees.

 The scope of cannabis legalization is well beyond current comprehension.  It's like looking up at the sky and considering everyone is here on a single planet flying through space at an unheard of speed, hanging on the tip of a galaxy, surrounded by an infinite number of galaxies all in sync doing their own thing as we individually try to get a clue as to what's for dinner tonight.

 

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Five States to Vote on Recreational Marijuana this November

The November elections are rapidly approaching, and marijuana industry entrepreneurs are watching closely the results of initiatives in five separate states that would pave the way for recreational marijuana dispensaries and more widespread cannabis cultivation. Voters in Arizona, California, Nevada, Maine, and Massachusettes will decide whether or not marijuana possession, cultivation, and retail recreational marijuana dispensaries will become legal just as they are in Colorado, Alaska, Oregon, Washington, and Washington D.C. Here is an overview of the different recreational marijuana legalization intitiatives for 2016 that will be decided on this November.

Arizona: Despite many challenges and obstacles along the way, Proposition 205 which would legalize recreational marijuana in Arizona has made its way onto the November ballot. A lawsuit that sought to block the measure from placement on the ballot was dismissed by the Superior Court of Maricopa County, and the Arizona Supreme Court upheld this decision after the challengers appealed. If voters approve the proposition, Arizona residents who are of adult age would be allowed to legally possess up to an ounce of marijuana, consume marijuana privately, and grow up to six marijuana plants. The proposition would also pave the way for retail recreational marijuana sales, imposing a 15% tax on cannabis sold at adult use marijuana dispensaries. The vote on the proposition is likely to be a close one. While a July poll showed only 39% of Arizona voters in support of marijuana legalization, the campaign in favor of Proposition 205 has raised a lot more money than the oppossition groups. The campaign for voting “yes” on Proposition 205 has amassed over three million dollars in donations, while the opposing campaign has raised less than one million. If Proposition 205 passes, revenues from taxes placed on retail marijuana sales will be utilized in part for education and public healthcare initiatives.

California: This November, California voters will decide on Proposition 64, titled the Adult Use of Marijuana Act. The proposition would allow for recreational marijuana sales and establish the right of citizens age 21 and over to grow up to six plants and posess up to an ounce of marijuana. A15% retail tax on recreational cannabis would be established, and a system for expunging the records of past non-violent marijuana convictions would be put into place. California was the first state to legalize medical marijuana, way back in 1996. If aproved, the taxes imposed on marijuana cultivation and sales could bring in over a billion dollars each year to California's strained budget, and could save the state millions by forgoing the expense of keeping non-violent marijuana offenders in prison. With millions more in fundraising donations raised by supporters and an August poll showing over 61% of California voters in favor of legalizing recreational marijuana, Proposition 64 is very likely to pass.

Maine: It was a rocky road, but Question 1 which would legalize recreational marijuana sales, possession, and cultivation within the state of Maine will be put into the hands of voters this November. When supporters of the measure first submitted the signatures required to place Question 1 on the ballot, over half of the signatures were invalidated which left the group falling short of requirements. They challenged the decision and the ruling was overturned. When the signatures were reexamined in April, it was found that there were enough valid signatures to get Question 1 on the November ballot. If Question 1 passes, Maine residents age 21 and older will be able to purchase or possess up to 2 ½ ounces of marijuana and grow up to 6 flowering marijuana plants at a time. It would also impose a 10% sales tax on recreational marijuana sales. With a March poll indicating only a little over 53% of voters in Maine in favor of legalization, the fate of Question 1 is unclear, but it's likely to be a close call whichever way voters decide.

Massachusetts: Voters in Massachusetts will decide on Question 4, which would legalize the possession of an ounce of marijuana, allow for the cultivation of up to six marijuana plants, and establish a sales tax for recreational marijuana sales. Although Massachusetts approved medical marijuana in 2012, the first medical marijuana dispensary in the state didn't open its doors until June of this year. That doesn't give voters much time to see the marijuana industry in action and gauge its potentials, so it may be tough for some people to make a decision on Question 4. While an April poll conducted by Western New England University found 57% of Massachusetts voters in favor of recreational marijuana legalization, a poll conducted in July by Gravis Marketing showed only 41% of Massachusetts voters in support of making recreational cannabis legal. If campaign finance is any indication of who the winning team is, Question 4 has a really good shot of passing. Supporters have raised nearly half a million, while the oppossition has collected virtually nothing. River Rock Wellness of Colorado is one of the top contributors to the campaign, donating $10,000 in support of Question 4.

Nevada: In Nevada, voters will decide on Question 2, would legalize the possession of up to an ounce of marijuana and allow adults to cultivate up to six marijuana plants. A 15% sales tax on recreational marijuana sales would be imposed, and consumption would be restricted to private areas which could include retail marijuana dispensaries. The tax revenue would be earmarked for use in the k-12 public education system. A poll conducted in July by a local news station found 50% of voters in support of Question 2, 41% oppossed, and 9% undecided, so it could really go either way and at this point, it's too close to call.

New Opportunities for Marijuana Businesses

The growing trend towards legalization opens the way for more marijuana businesses to thrive and profit. Entrepreneurs who are contemplating opening a marijuana dispensary, grow house, or other marijuana business in one of the five states who  are voting on recreational cannabis should look closely at each state's laws now to get an idea of all the details and regulations, and how to start the process of applying for a marijuana business license. States like Nevada will limit the number of marijuana establishments that can open up in any municipality if their legalization initiative passes, so business owners wishing to cash in will need to be ready to act quickly once the votes are counted. CannaSaver will keep you informed of the latest updates and elections results, so stay tuned.

 

 

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