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The Green Party Stance on Marijuana Legalization

Posted by CANNASaver on Wednesday, 26 October 2016 in Canna Blog

Marijuana and The Green Party

With the 2016 elections quickly approaching and Green Party candidates like Jill Stein coming onto the radar of an increasing number of disillusioned voters, many in the marijuana industry are wondering, just how green is the Green Party? What is the party’s stance on marijuana reform, and would the marijuana industry find some safeguards under Green Party leadership? Would marijuana dispensaries in Colorado and other legal weed states face fewer regulations or more? While Presidential candidate Jill Stein isn't expected to get anywhere near the number of votes she needs to win, she may very well get enough votes to earn the Green Party a spot in future election debates. The Green Party already holds over 100 positions across the nation at the city and county level, and with more and more states opening up to legal marijuana, the party is definitely gaining supporters as well as attention. Here is the lowdown on where the Green Party stands on the green.

Protection for the Marijuana Industry

The Green Party platform includes powerful protections and safeguards for the legal marijuana industry, which is important to states like Colorado where marijuana is big business. Not only does the party platform call for the legalization of cannabis possession, sale, and cultivation, but also the DEA would be instructed to not interfere with or harass legally operating cannabis businesses, from marijuana cultivation centers to marijuana dispensaries and marijuana social clubs. Marijuana entrepreneurs would have some assurance that their businesses could continue, while new marijuana entrepreneurs would have the protection needed to open new businesses and industries.

Amnesty for marijuana offenders

The Green Party platform also calls for serious reforms to how the criminal justice system handles drug offenders. Drug use and abuse would no longer be handled as a crime but as a medical issue, and anyone currently being held on charges for non-violent marijuana crimes would be released.

Opponents worry that the Green Party's stance on drugs goes too far, not only legalizing cannabis but also paving the way for the decriminalization of extremely dangerous drugs such as crack and heroin.

Running on Reefer

Green Party candidates are outspoken in their support of marijuana legalization. Throughout her campaign, Presidential candidate Jill Stein has made reference to the need for drug reform and has voiced her support for marijuana legalization at the national level. Other Green Party candidates are also using marijuana legalization to gain supporters. Vanessa Tijerina, who is running for a congressional seat in southern Texas, has made a point of bringing medical marijuana into the spotlight, campaigning to raise public awareness about the medical benefits of cannabis.

The Future of the Green

With a majority of Americans now supporting marijuana legalization, the Green Party with its pro-cannabis platform could soon become a prominent feature of our country’s political landscape. While they're unlikely to win many races this time around, the mere presence of Green Party candidates on the ballot brings needed attention to marijuana legalization and the millions of citizens who support it. With dispensaries and other marijuana businesses on the line in states like Colorado, the sharp divisions that have separated political parties for decades have already begun to blur.

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CannaSaver Blog

Marijuana Laws in Colorado

Posted by CANNASaver on Friday, 05 June 2015 in Canna Blog

 

 

 

 

 

Colorado Recreational Marijuana Laws

With the passing of Amendment 64 on November 6, 2012 adults 21 years of age and older can now legally possess 1 ounce of marijuana or any product containing THC in Colorado, including concentrates, edibles and cannabis seeds. Recreational stores didn't officially open until January 1, 2014. You don't have to be a resident of Colorado or register anywhere to consume recreational marijuana, it applies to anyone 21 and above who has a valid government issued ID. The law also allows each adult to grow up to 6 plants, 3 of which can be in the flowering stage in an enclosed, locked space.

Although any adult is allowed to possess up to 1 ounce, non-residents of Colorado will be restricted to purchasing no more than 1/4 ounce (7 grams) in a single transaction. This law was created to prevent visitors from going around to multiple stores and stockpiling marijuana for export. There is nothing illegal about visiting more than 1 store a day, but most recreational stores will only serve you once a day. As long as you don't exceed the 1 ounce per person possession limit, you are still within the law. Please be aware that your right to possess marijuana in Colorado does not apply when you are visiting national parks, national forests or monuments or other federal properties, such as courthouses.  Also be aware that many ski areas are located on federal land.

The state allows marijuana stores to operate from 8am to midnight, but cities can impose more restrictive hours than the state allows. Denver stores are required to close by 7pm, Aurora stores are open till 10pm and other places like Glendale are open till midnight, so check the hours of the store if you plan on going after 7pm.

Amendment 64 does not permit the consumption of marijuana "openly and publicly." You can still get a ticket for smoking weed in public, similar to open container laws for drinking in public. Discretion is appreciated, and usually required. Technically you are also not allowed to blaze indoors at any bar, club, or restaurant due to the clean indoor air act. Private cannabis clubs are the exception to this rule, where you can buy a day membership. Some allow indoor smoking since they are private and others allow vaping inside and smoking outside. Even though concert venues are private, many consider them publicly accessible private venues, and therefore consumption of marijuana is prohibited, but it really depends on the venue and the crowd as to how these rules are applied, so just air on the cautious side when smoking at a concert.

Driving under the influence of marijuana is illegal and the legal limit is 5 nanograms per milliliter of blood, but this law has been highly debated because people metabolize THC at different rates and the amount of impairment varies drastically for each person. Unlike alcohol, it's hard to determine if a person is impaired based on THC levels. If the police do suspect you of driving stoned, they can require you to take a blood test. We all should know when were impaired or not, so just be smart and don't drive under the influence.

The open container law  in Colorado makes it illegal to possess marijuana in the passenger area of a vehicle if it is in an open container, a container with a broken seal, or if there is evidence of consumption.  But this is questionable because what constitutes an open container of marijuana? 

Exporting marijuana from Colorado is illegal and the Feds are watching Colorado very closely as the bordering states are extremely pissed off that we have such relaxed marijuana laws, so simply put, don't do it. Mailing weed home or to your buddies is also a bad idea.

 

 

 

 

 

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Oregon loses Hightimes Cannabis Cup in 2015 to Northern Cali!

It is a sad day in Oregon when the OLCC (Oregon Liquor Control Commission) will prevent a huge event like Hightimes Cannabis Cup from being in a venue that is large enough for 5000+ people. Regardless if liquor is served or not this did not matter to the OLCC when they threatened that any venue that allowed Hightimes to throw their event would be in danger of losing their liquor license. According to Hightimes this one Cannabis Cup could have brought in hundreds of thousands of dollars and possibly millions of dollars in revenue for Oregon.
 
Amanda YoungerHIGH TIMES Event Director, stated “Bringing the HIGH TIMES Cannabis Cup to Oregon has proven to be a Herculean task— in fact, it’s been the most difficult of all of our Cannabis Cups to get off the ground.

It seems funny that the citizens of a State that has made the choice to legalize marijuana
still have to pay the penalty for old school politics. 

What do YOU think?

We have noticed while reading the news lately that there is
still a lot Canna Bigotry in the United States.

Like for instance, Cyd Maurer, 25, a University of Oregon graduate who was the morning weekend anchor at Eugene's ABC affiliate "KEZI."  She was fired after getting into a minor accident while on the job. She was truthful with her supervisor about the use of legal recreational marijuana but of course after her drug test for work came back positive for THC she was fired.

Well guess what?

She's fighting back and now is a activist for the legal marijuana movement.

What are the weed laws going to be in the future?
This is a very touchy situation now that Oregon has made marijuana legal.

How does this play out with you and your job?

 
Canna Saver Oregon would love to hear what your thoughts are on this topic.
Express yourself - You never know there may be a coupon in it for ya. LOL 
Have a Beautiful Oregon Day!
 

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If successful, the California Craft Cannabis Initiative could lead to better quality cannabis in California and beyond. Drafted by lawyers Heather Burke and Omar Figueroa, the initiative is one of a large handful of recreational marijuana legalization measures vying to make it onto the November 2016 statewide ballot. In addition to retroactively legalizing the use, cultivation, possession, transportation, processing, distribution, and sale of marijuana by persons 21 years of age and older, the initiative would establish a seed bank dedicated to the preservation and development of cannabis strains, and would also provide incentives to encourage small-scale growers to produce top-quality weed. We've all heard of craft beers, but have you ever heard of craft cannabis? The concept is the same whether we're talking beer or buds. Small-scale, focused production allows artisans the opportunity to create unique, unusual, or specialty products of often exceptional quality. If California's Craft Cannabis Initiative passes, craft cannabis growers could actually register and trademark their buds. For instance, their would likely be regional designations such as “Humboldt County” or “Emerald Triangle,” as well as certified strains.

What this would mean for the average California cannabis consumer is that what you pay for is what you get, at least when purchasing a certified or trademark-registered product. Seems like a simple enough consumer expectation, but this isn't always the case in legal recreational cannabis states like Colorado, Oregon, and Washington where strains are often misnamed, ill grown, and poorly preserved in the mass-production frenzy of trying to meet an ever-rising demand. No means for certifying any particular strains of marijuana exist in these states, which basically results in anyone being able to call their buds anything they like and sell them under any name they choose, and consumers having nothing other than their own eyes, nose, and knowledge of cannabis to help them tell the difference. That Lemon Haze might be Lemon Haze, or it might not. That “rare” strain whose name you've never heard of before could be good old Blue Dream with a fancy new alias. If the initiative in California passes and other states decide to adopt their own certification mechanisms, consumers would be able to tell exactly what they were getting, and growers would have an incentive to protect their strains and develop them to their fullest potential.

The California Craft Cannabis Initiative would also provide an opportunity for growers to have their crops certified organic. This is something none of the legal marijuana states currently offer, which again leaves the consumer with little but their own judgment and the shopkeeper's word to go on when hoping to purchase organically-grown cannabis. As it stands, much of the marijuana sold at dispensaries is coated with pesticides and often contains fungus or heavy metals. It might say “organic,” but there isn't really any way of knowing whether or not it actually is. The California Craft Cannabis Initiative would make it possible for consumers to choose products that are certified organic, which could encourage other legal weed states to follow suit.

The initiative also calls for the establishment of the California Cannabis Genetic Repository. The repository would collect germplasm from all known cannabis strains, carefully preserving and documenting the biodiversity of the cannabis genus. Researchers and others wishing to study the cannabis plant would have free access to the repository, which could lead to the development of strains with higher potency, new hybrids, and more. As the nation's herb supply continues to be flooded with mislabeled or wrongly identified strains, preserving the genetics of specific cannabis strains becomes increasingly important not just for California, but for the world. The sponsors of the California Craft Cannabis Initiative have until December 21st to collect the 365,880 signatures required to get the measure placed on next November's ballot. There are at least ten other recreational cannabis legalization initiatives that are in the process of meeting requirements to make it on the ballot, as well. For more information including the full text of the California Craft Cannabis Initiative, visit www.californiacannabis2016.com .

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Federal Court Rules in Favor of Cannabis Church

by Melanie Marquis

In a federal court ruling on December 7th, the Healing Church of Rhode Island won its legal right to use and distribute cannabis as part of its religious ceremonies. Founded on the belief that cannabis is a healing agent and holy sacrament mentioned throughout the original Hebrew biblical texts as a plant known as “KNH BSM,” the Healing Church uses cannabis for anointing, healing, and offerings. Monday's ruling was only a partial victory for the church, however, as federal court Judge Mary Lisi upheld the group's rights to consume and share cannabis with its congregation, but stopped short of granting the church permission to perform their cannabis ceremonies on federal lands. The battle has largely centered around a well located at the Roger Williams National Memorial in Providence, Rhode Island, a place the Healing Church believes is religiously significant, and a place which also happens to be a part of the National Parks system. Referencing their belief in the location as the birthplace of religious freedom as well as a sacred site linked to the resurgence of the “holy KNH BSM”--a.k.a. “biblical cannabis”--the group applied for a permit and federal injunction in May of this year to be allowed to hold a cannabis ceremony at the memorial. While their permit to conduct the ceremony was approved, the injunction to burn cannabis offerings as part of the religious ritual was denied. The group held their services anyway and faced fines, confiscation of various religious artifacts, and alleged harassment of church members.

Undeterred, church leaders filed an affidavit with the federal courts asking for their Constitutional rights to freely practice their religion to be permanently secured and upheld, including their right to conduct religious ceremonies with cannabis at the Roger Williams National Memorial. While the church can now use cannabis at private locations of worship without fear of legal consequences, Judge Lisi ruled that the group could not conduct their cannabis rites at the Roger Williams National Memorial well until they are able to fully demonstrate to the court's satisfaction the particular importance of practicing these ceremonies at the specific site in question. The Healing Church is planning to file an appeal.

 

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On June 26, 2018, Oklahomans voted overwhelmingly to pass State Question 788. This made the Sooner State the 30th state in the union to legalize a medical cannabis program. This historic event not only laid the groundwork to create the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority but created the framework that allows residents to become licensed to use medical marijuana. Ever since the formation of the medical program in Oklahoma, there has been a surge of interest in medical marijuana

Patients want to quickly get licensed and get into a legal dispensary to buy everything from flower by the ounce to concentrates & carts, and even Rick Simpson Oil. One of the most common concerns, however, is whether a physical ID card is needed to get into a dispensary. 

Since many patients are notified of their approval before the card actually arrives, they are understandably eager to get stocked up on their preferred products. We’re going to dig into just what you’ll need to be able to shop your local dispensary, and how to best take advantage of local offers and discounts.

Can You Go Into A Dispensary Without A Card In Oklahoma?

The short answer is no. 

You will need a physical, state-issued medical marijuana card in order to even enter a dispensary. In most cases, once you enter the dispensary you will be required to present your medical card and photo ID to be allowed entry to the main sales floor.

Additionally, the law requires that anyone in possession of marijuana or other cannabis products, for medical purposes, to have a medical card. This means that even if you could get into a dispensary and buy something without a card, you would still be breaking the law by not being licensed to possess the products. This is crucial if you are stopped by law enforcement while transporting your medicine home. 

How Can I Get A Medical Card In Oklahoma?

Even though you’ll need a medical card to get into any medical marijuana dispensary in the Sooner State, getting one isn’t complicated, and once you’ve got it you’ll be able to get the medicine and care you need. Here’s a quick rundown on the steps you’ll need to take to get legal.

Qualifying

There are some basic qualifications that you’ll need to meet before you can make an official application, but it’s generally quick and easy. First, you’ll need to be at least 18 years old, and be able to prove your identity. You’ll also need to include current, valid proof of Oklahoma residency, and a full-face color digital picture.

The final qualifier is that your application will also need to include a recommendation from a licensed physician, which is the step that most people dread. However, unlike the medical programs in many other states, Oklahoma has not legislated a specific list of conditions that qualify. There are even telehealth services that allow you to meet with a physician, virtually, to obtain the recommendation needed for your Oklahoma medical card. 

Application & Approval

Once you have the required documentation and your physician’s recommendation, you’ll need to submit the application to the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority or OMMA. They are the governing body charged with approving and licensing all activities related to medical cannabis.

I’ve Got My Oklahoma Medical Card - Now What?

Once you’ve got your card in the mail, all that’s left is to shop for your meds. Many patients will visit a dispensary that same day, and probably spend more than they need to on their purchase. 

Before you head out, the best thing to do is browse the dispensary’s inventories, look for deals, and place your order. This way you can get the best price on what you want, and it can help avoid impulse buys that may or may not be economical. Below are some of the most popular medical marijuana categories.

Flower

Dried flower is one of the most popular ways to consume medical cannabis. Not only is there a wide variety of strains and effects available, but it is often one of the most cost-effective products. Many dispensaries offer deals for flower by the ounce.

Prerolls

Like flower, but don’t like the hassle of constantly grinding it and rolling your own? Skip the whole process with professional prerolls. Same medicine without the wait, and perfect for portability.

Concentrates

Concentrates, dabs, wax. Call it what you will, but cannabis extracts are one of the hottest ways to consume. You can get a robust dose in just one or two hits while getting a richer terpene profile for the best smell and taste you can imagine.

Carts

For the potency of concentrates with unmatched portability, vape carts are the way to go. Full of delicious terpenes, and some of the highest potency products available. 

Edibles

With many conditions, smoking or even vaping can prove too harsh or difficult. For more convenient dosing, edibles like gummies, candy, and even drinks can have you feeling better fast.

Clones & Seeds

Many people prefer to grow their own, putting their own love and care into their medicine. To keep your garden full to its limits, local dispensaries will also have clones and seeds. Find deals on the strains you love, and get your green thumb working. 

Things to Know About Medical Marijuana in Oklahoma

The Oklahoma medical marijuana industry is booming, and with a little effort and a license fee, any residents with qualifying conditions and a physician’s recommendation can begin shopping. The state is also ready to ask Oklahomans to vote on State Question 819, which if passed, will create a recreational marijuana market for the Sooner State in just two months. 

While many other states have been able to pass recreational legislation on top of previously-approved medical infrastructure, some have failed or have taken much longer to implement. With that in mind, you may want to get your medical card now so that you can avoid delays, as well as take advantage of the ongoing coupons and sales that many dispensaries have. 

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Slowly but surely, pot prohibition is ending state by state. Usually, states start with okaying marijuana use for medical reasons. In June of 2018, that’s precisely what Oklahoma did.

That made it the 30th US state to allow medical weed use. In the first year, 7300 cannabis-related companies were licensed. Over 5% of Oklahoma residents are currently certified for prescribed pot.

As of yet, however, the government has not opened up the state for recreational use. However, the legislature did decriminalize possession for non-medical use. There’s still a fine, but no jail time for small amounts.

Let’s take a look at specific laws about Oklahoma medical marijuana. You should know particulars about licensing and possession.

Visitors to the state can get temporary permits. We’ll discuss that in more depth.

Then we’ll talk about the possibility of the state legalizing recreational in the future.

Lastly, we’ll show how you can save on Oklahoman prescribed pot.

Let’s start by detailing what the law allows.

oklahoma medical marijuana laws

What is OK in the Oklahoma Medical Use Law?

There’s something very significant about Oklahoma’s requirements for cannabis-consuming patients. That is that there are no qualifying conditions. All that is necessary is a doctor’s recommendation.

That’s unusual compared to other places with legalized medical marijuana. Other states, like Illinois for example, have a list of provisos for prescribing weed. Not so in Oklahoma.

So, what does the law stipulate?

The medical recommendation from a doctor must include written documentation.

There is a requirement that patients have to be at least 18 years old. Those younger than that need no less than two doctors to write recommendations. Underage applicants also must have the support of their parents or a guardian.

Only parents or guardians can pick the pot up from dispensaries for younger users.

Applications for all aspiring users are approved or denied within 14 days.

Cultivation of plants by and for patients is allowed. Though, like any other state that has legalized growing, there are limitations.

Caregivers can also be qualified to provide services. This benefits license holders who may be homebound.

Those applying to operate bud businesses must be at least 25 years old. They must also be state residents. All operations must be 75% owned by Oklahomans.

The fee for business licensing is $2500. It is non-refundable if the application fails.

Licenses, regulations, and administration fall to OMMA. That’s the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority. They oversee rules and procedures for patients and caregivers. Further, dispensaries, growers, processors, and physicians fall under their jurisdiction.

The agency maintains a state website. There, patients and providers can apply for licenses. There are also links to streamline the process for personal and business applicants. And they give answers to frequently asked questions.

All medical cards are also registered with OBNDDC. That's the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control.

The cost of each application is $100. For patients with Medicaid or Medicare, the cost is only $20. All approved medical cards are good for two years.

medical marijuana in oklahoma

What About Out-of-State Weed Patients?

Medical-use patients with a card from another state can apply for a temporary patient license. That waiver is good for 30 days. The cost for a temporary permit is $100, the same as a residential certification.

With a temp license, visitors can shop at any certified dispensary within the state. They can also possess and grow ganja. But only for 30 days from the issuing of their permit.

In 2021, a move was made to amend the rules for visitors. The Oklahoma House of Representatives did pass a bill expanding temporary licenses to 2 years. But that did not pass in the senate, thus the temp license remains at 30 days.

Tourists cannot bring their own stash of weed into Oklahoma. Marijuana is still federally illegal and so transporting any across state lines is a crime. Out-of-state medical users must buy within the state.

How Much Medical Marijuana Can You Buy at a Time?

Approved state license holders can possess up to eight ounces of marijuana flower in their homes. At any one time, patients are allowed three ounces of weed on their person.

For concentrates the limit is one ounce.

Edible products cannot exceed 72 ounces.

Those cultivating cannabis can own no more than six mature marijuana plants. Additionally, they may have up to six non-flowering seedling plants. So, that’s a combination of 12 plants altogether.

Out-of-staters with a temporary med card have the same purchasing and possession limits.

The state decriminalized possession, but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing to worry about. If you’re unlicensed and are holding cannabis, there is some concern.

Those who don’t have a med license face a minimum $400 fine if found in possession of pot. That’s if they have no more than 1 and a half ounces of cannabis. More than that and the fine steepens, plus there’s the likelihood of jail time.

For businesses, there are limits to sales to individuals. Provisioning centers are prohibited from selling over three ounces of cannabis flower. Restrictions specify no more than one ounce of marijuana concentrate dispensed at one time. There is a cap of 72 total ounces of medical marijuana products.

medical marijuana regulations in oklahoma

Is Recreational Next for Oklahoma?

As of early 2022, there are two petitions to put recreational pot use on the ballot. If passed, the initiative seeks to also have convictions for possession reversed. It also would expunge criminal records.

Also proposed is a 15% excise tax on potential sales. Currently, there is a 7% tax on all medical marijuana sales - plus state sales tax.

Time will tell if Oklahoma voters go the way of other states and add a recreational weed option.

Oklahoma Marijuana Deals on Cannasaver

Because Cannasaver is now in Oklahoma, medical marijuana cardholders can save some money!

It’s not hard to find great bud bargains, just type ‘Oklahoma’ into the upper search bar. Then click Oklahoma under location. That will show you relevant deals and dispensaries.

Then you can shop, save, and enjoy!

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Dispensaries are popping up everywhere, in more and more states. But just how many dispensaries can you visit in one day? And how much can you buy?

This can be asked by a cannabis consumer who wants to purchase as much as they can in one day or perhaps someone who wants to stock up on a certain brand or strain that is hard to find. Since we focus on deals and dispensaries mostly in Arizona, Colorado, and Illinois for now, we will keep our focus on those three states.

In these states (and more to come), Cannasaver offers the best dispensary deals and coupons with savings of up to 75% on ounces, concentrates, shatter, wax, edibles, and more.

If you allow the location services on your browser, you will get the best deals right close by.

Most states have their marijuana laws written in ounces of cannabis; however, some states discuss also discuss grams (g) of flower, in which 28 g equal to 1 ounce, while others consider 30 g equal to one ounce.

How Many Dispensaries Can You Visit in One Day in Arizona?

In Arizona, there is no limit on the number of dispensaries you can visit in one day, but there is a limit on the amount you can purchase in a time span of 14 days.

In Arizona, the amount a recreational user can purchase in 14 days is 1 ounce of cannabis, with no more than 5 gm of the 1 ounce being marijuana concentrate. Consumers who have medical marijuana cards or licenses are allowed to purchase 2.5 ounces every 14 days.

Check out some great Arizona cannabis deals and coupons here.

If you’re wondering how different dispensaries and cannabis stores in Arizona keep track of the amount you buy, it is through a central computer system.

The different Arizona dispensaries are supposed to keep track of all their sold cannabis products, which include dates and ingredients. Different dispensaries may have different systems, but they are supposed to report to the same database and share information.

How Many Dispensaries Can You Visit in One Day, in Colorado?

Like Arizona, you can visit as many times as you’d like, but there is a limit on the amount you can purchase.

Colorado calculates the amount purchased daily, unlike Arizona which calculates the amount purchased every 14 days. Colorado also allows much more to be purchased, compared to Arizona.

There is not really a central computer system in Colorado, where dispensaries keep track of what consumers purchase at other dispensaries.

Because of this issue, Colorado dispensaries usually allow the purchase up to the legal possession limits, at one time.

This amount is 1 ounce of flower (or 2 ounces of flower for a medical marijuana patient), 8 gm of concentrate, or 800 mg of edibles.

Note that a medical marijuana patient can have twice the amount of flower, compared to a recreational user; however, the same limits on concentrate and edibles apply. There is an exception in which medical marijuana patients ages 18-20 can only purchase 2 gm per day. Here are some great cannabis deals and coupons available in Colorado.

You must be aware of these possession limits when purchasing.

For example, a recreational user could go into one dispensary to purchase one ounce, and then go to another dispensary to purchase another ounce; however, while the dispensary might not be aware of it, you would be over the possession legal limit and breaking the law.

How Many Dispensaries Can You Visit in One Day in Illinois?

Like Arizona and Colorado, the number of dispensaries you can visit in one day in Illinois is unlimited; however, there is a limit on how much can be purchased. Like Colorado, the amount that can be purchased is based on the legal limit for possession.

Illinois does differ from Arizona and Colorado, in that the limits of recreational cannabis depend on if you are a resident of Illinois or from out of state.

Please note that either way, cannabis cannot be purchased in Illinois and then legally transported across state lines. This is due to a federal law that cannabis users cannot transport cannabis across any state line.

For Illinois residents, purchase or possession is allowed for 30 gm of cannabis flower, up to 500 gm of THC (the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis that causes the “high” feeling users experience), or 5 gm of cannabis concentrates, such as waxes or oils.

For edibles, also called cannabis-infused products, the weight in gm is calculated by the weight of the total product; thus, a recreational cannabis edible should not weigh more than 500 gm,

For non-Illinois residents, the possession limits are half of what an Illinois resident can purchase. So, a non-Illinois resident can purchase/possess 15 gm of cannabis flower, 250 gm of THC infused products or 2.5 gm of cannabis concentrates.

In Illinois, the legal limits of each type are allowed to all be maxed out, at the same time. In other words, a recreational Illinois resident user can purchase or possess up to 30 gm of flower, 500 gm of THC cannabis-infused products, and 500 gm of edibles, all at the same time.

The amounts of medical cannabis that can be purchased are calculated over a two-week period, with 2.5 ounces or 71 gm every 14 days. A waiver can be obtained through the state if someone’s medical condition requires a higher dose.

Where cannabis can be legally used, varies by state. In Arizona, cannabis use is prohibited in public places, with the exception of edibles. The edibles can be consumed in a public place, as long as the consumer is not operating a vehicle. In Colorado and Illinois, the use of any cannabis products, including edibles, is not legal in public places.

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There is widespread weed legalization from state to state. Yet cannabis consumers who travel can run into a real problem. When you leave your state, you can’t take it with you. That’s because federally, weed is still illegal.

It’s a big country and sometimes you gotta get where you’re going by plane. Air travel is governed by the Transportation Security Administration. Currently, the TSA only makes allowances for medical users. But even if you have a medical use license, you can still potentially get in legal trouble.

For recreational weed users, there are no real TSA exemptions. So, if you can’t bring your stash with you, are you straight out of luck? Not necessarily.

There are recreational states that do allow you to buy with an out-of-state license. Let’s take a look at local cannabis laws.

Can You Buy Recreational Weed with an Out-of-State License in Colorado?

Colorado is a popular tourist destination. There’s Rocky Mountain National Park. Skiers flock to Vail and Aspen. Suffice to say, there’s much to see and do.

For 420 enthusiasts, Colorado is special. It was the first state to legalize both medical and recreational cannabis

Cool, but what does it mean for our jurisdiction tokers?

For Colorado locals, you have to be 21 or older to buy recreational weed. With a medical license, you can shop dispensaries as young as 18 years old. Out-of-state visitors can buy as much marijuana as residents. Tourists merely need a valid form of ID, such as a driver’s license from their own local.

So, that’s a big yes for buying buds recreationally, even if you aren’t a Colorado native.

How Much Recreational Weed Can You Buy in Colorado?

In Colorado, both residents and guests are limited to 1 oz of cannabis flower

The law further specifies that to be equal to 8 grams of concentrate or 800 milligrams of edibles. That’s just one of those not all three. They will add the weight of the weed together.

Can You Buy Recreational Weed with an Out-of-State License in Arizona?

Arizona is another place people like to visit. 

What’s there? There’s Hoover Dam – that’s really interesting. 

Deserts are everywhere. 

Oh, yeah, and they also have the Grand Canyon. It’s a big attraction.

What’s the situation with legalization? 

First of all, recreational cannabis became legal there in 2021. State law allows local residents who are 21 years or older to buy cannabis. And medical marijuana is allowable for 18-year-olds and up.

But can you buy weed there if you’re just visiting? Tourists can indeed buy cannabis with a valid legal ID. As with Colorado, a driver’s license will do ya.

Therefore, Arizona gets a thumbs up for being friendly to out-of-state stoners.

How Much Recreational Weed Can You Buy in Arizona?

Now in Arizona, visitors get to buy up to an ounce of bud. Both concentrates and edibles are limited to 5 grams. Again, that’s the total amount. So, authorities will add them collectively. And officials will penalize you for going over the ounce limit – or the equivalent in concentrates and/or edibles.

Can You Buy Recreational Weed With an Out-of-State License in Illinois?

How about the ‘Land of Lincoln’ as Illinois is known?

You may decide to go visit Illinois for a number of reasons

Chicago is one of the biggest tourist destinations. 

There are museums, restaurants, and entertainment venues aplenty in the Windy City. But Illinois also boasts a number of pleasant parks and scenic drives along Lake Michigan. Consequently, you likely will find much to do while on vacation there.

How is the local ganja scene? In 2020, cannabis consumption for recreational users became allowable by law in Illinois. Medical licenses are available for those with qualifying medical conditions. In both medical and recreational instances, you have to be at least 21 years old.

Residents can buy 30 grams of marijuana or up to 500 grams of THC. Thus, they restrict the amount of the psychotropic element in pot. So, you can get less of higher-level THC cannabis.

And are visitors allowed to buy Illinois herbs?  

The answer is once again a resounding yes. As with the other places above, tourists just need a driver's license or other legal ID.

That said, the Illinois legal situation is a bit more complex. It’s still good, but there’s more you must pay attention to. 

How Much Recreational Weed Can You Buy in Illinois?

The rules in Illinois for pot products, between residents and visitors, are not the same. Tourists are restricted to half the legal limit that residents can buy - 15g of flower or 250g of THC. And only purchasing 2.5 grams of concentrates. And those as well as edibles count towards the 250 grams of THC.

Cities like Gulfport, along the Illinois border, may get traffic from those wanting to cross state lines. But taking the weed back over to another state is illegal.

Out-of-State Recreational Weed Laws Summarized

So, what have we learned?

In none of the areas above are you allowed to take any dispensary purchases back out of state. 

You have to consume your cannabis while you are there on vaycay.

Also, all of the places we looked at do allow provisioning center purchases for people who come from out of state. However, there are limits to how much herb each of them allows.

Now, you’re not going to fill up a trash bag with ganja goodies in any of the above locations. All these places put restrictions on how much marijuana even locals can buy. Generally, visitors have the same restrictions or more.

Great Deals on Recreational Weed

Okay so, did you think we’d take you this far without some recreational discounts on weed

Whether you’re a resident or visitor, you can save on your bud. 

Cannasaver offers the best dispensary deals and coupons with savings of up to 75% on ounces, concentrates, shatter, wax, edibles, and more.

Simply search by area in the top-left search bar, or click on Featured Stores to find dispensaries nearest you!

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CannaSaver Blog

Illinois Marijuana Laws

Posted by CANNASaver on Thursday, 24 March 2022 in Canna Blog

Nowadays, a number of states have legalized weed. Some have "okayed" cannabis recreationally, some medically, and some both.

Illinois has both types. And, just like every other legal state, it has laws. These laws govern who can have weed and how much. Further, they govern who can grow it and who can sell it.

There are differences in the rules for medical and recreational users. They regulate how much and what kind of weed either kind of cannabis consumer can have. And they regulate the total amount of THC in the marijuana merchandise you buy.

There are even guidelines for out-of-state shoppers. The legislature has been quite thorough in enacting laws to govern the use of ganja. Let's go over Illinois marijuana laws – both recreational and medical.


Let's start with when this all began.

When Did Marijuana Become "Legalized" in Illinois?

The legalization of cannabis in the United States began with medical use in California in 1996. Following that, Washington and Colorado were the first states to legalize recreational in 2012.

Illinois approved a limited medical marijuana program in 2013. Recreational weed was approved by the legislature to begin in January of 2020.

There are some notable differences between the two categories of weed laws. 

We’ll look at those distinctions in depth.

Medical Marijuana Laws in Illinois

The state’s Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act took effect on July 15, 2014. It allowed for 35 qualifying conditions. Notably, at the time, qualifiers did not include chronic pain, the main reason for most medical use.

A qualified doctor must attest that marijuana is a necessary medicine for applicants. Anyone 18 years old and up can apply for a license. In some instances, adults can apply for caregiver licenses for minor children. 

There have been significant adjustments to rules for patients since 2014. For instance, chronic pain has been added to the acceptable conditions list. The opioid crisis was a major motivator for expanding medical marijuana access.

How much can cannabis cardholders acquire?

How Much Medical Can You Buy at a Time?

Pot patients in the Land of Lincoln, as Illinois is known, can get 2.5 ounces, or 71 grams, of ganja within a two-week period

They may own up to 5 grams of concentrates. 

They may have up to 500 mg of THC period. 

Flower, edibles, and concentrates cannot exceed 500mg of total THC.

Should a doctor indicate, cardholders can get waivers for more weed through the state. 

Plants are also possible for patients to get and grow, but they are limited to five. As with many states, cannabis crops must be kept out of public view. Using weed is also restricted to private, personal spaces.

Cannabis consumers with a med license can also purchase through registered caregivers. These agents can only serve one patient at a time. They can also pick up marijuana medicine for homebound patients. Caregiver cannabis has the same limits as other medical marijuana licenses.

How are laws and limits different for casual users?

Recreational Marijuana Laws in Illinois 

In 2016, the state did decriminalize possessing less than 10 grams of marijuana. For small amounts, the penalty was set at $200.

January 2020 was the beginning of recreational use in the state. The law stipulates an age limit of 21 years or older.

As with pretty much every other state, it is prohibited to use cannabis products in public. Transportation must be in sealed containers stored away from anyone driving an automobile. Obviously, driving while high is a crime.

Breaking weed laws have severe consequences. 

For instance, holding more than 30 to 100 grams of marijuana is considered a Class A misdemeanor. And that is punished by up to a year in prison, plus a potential fine of $2500.

Only licensed dispensaries can sell weed, recreational or otherwise. Individuals cannot sell cannabis to anyone else. Nor can individuals grow their own plants without a medical license.

Individual localities in Illinois can decide if they want to allow provisioning centers. They cannot supersede state laws about personal use or possession. You can find out where to legally buy weed from the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation. Or by searching here on Cannasaver, especially in the Chicago area.

Cannabis consumers must show a valid ID. You must prove you are 21 years old or older. All sales are cash because, at this time, credit cards cannot be used.

There is an allowance for out-of-state users to buy recreationally. They also need a valid ID from their own state. Visitors have reduced amounts they can purchase, as detailed below.

Suffice to say, tourists also face stiff penalties if they possess over the legal limits.

All that said, how much can recreational users buy?

How Much Recreational Can You Buy at a Time? 

As indicated above, the regulations are different for casual cannabis use.

Those without a med license can get up to an ounce of herb. Cannabis concentrates are limited to 5 grams. And edibles or tinctures are restricted to 500 milligrams of THC.

The total limit is 500 milligrams. 

That’s all of the THC altogether between flower, concentrates, and edibles.

That’s the rub in Illinois – they restrict the amount of THC in the weed you buy. So, you can purchase less weed with higher THC levels. These limits are for a two-week period – thus every two weeks you can buy and own up to the restrictions.

As previously mentioned, out of staters can get recreational cannabis in Illinois. However, they are restricted to half the amount locals can get. So, that’s a half-ounce of flower and 2.5 grams of concentrate. The total THC cap is 250 milligrams. That’s everything - flower, edibles, and concentrates added together.

For locals or tourists, there are ways to save some green on your ganja.

Illinois Marijuana Deals on Cannasaver 

Cannasaver is now in Illinois! Filter Illinois dispensaries by typing in "Chicago" in the top search bar. Then click "Chicago" under "Location."

We offer the best dispensary deals and coupons with savings of up to 75% on ounces, concentrates, shatter, wax, edibles, and more.

30% off your first medical purchase at Sunnyside!

Mindy's Edibles 100mg $30 in Chicago!

Bedford Grow Concentrates $70/1Gram

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